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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
recreational use of marijuana, which will mark the beginning of the end of the war on drugs. this may be the most costly and futile war the united states has ever waged. we've spent $1 trillion to fight this war without reducing availableability of drugs while also destroying our pea nal system. according to data from the oecd. about 1 president 6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicates that americans have begun rethunking these policies, perhaps moving toward ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most sturching shift came not in the pass of a ball let measure but an exit poll finding, one that mierch move us. >> when asked what to do, almost two-thirds wanted to grant them legal access. john mccain had to run away from his own handiwork when he was campaigning for the white house. i hesitate to build a grand narrative out of all of this, but the trend seems to be toward individual freedom, self-expression, and dignity for all. this divers
>> sno liebee . >> thank you so much. >> is that it? does everyone clap for us? >> i'm the only clap. >>> thanks for watching "state of the union." i'm candy crowley in washington. head to cnn.com/sotu for analysis. look for us on itunes. "fareed zakaria gps" in next for our viewers in the united states. >> this is gps, the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. we have a great show for you. first a rare treat. two great historians on what makes for a successful second term. jon meacham and robert carroll talk about their subjects, thomas jefferson, lyndon johnson, and a bit about barack obama as well. >>> then the conflict in gaza yet again reminds us forget about globalization and information revolution. if you want to understand the world, look at geography. nations are still bound by it, says robert kaplan, who uses maps to show us what to worry about. you won't want to miss this. >>> and the middle class is rising. no, not here in the united states, but right next door in latin america, and it will have hug
how we get the rest of the u.s. economic house in order. >>> then an exclusive interview with bill gates, the richest man in the united states and the world's biggest philanthropist. i'll get his thoughts on the president's re-election, on the new innovation economy, and the revolution taking place in education. >>> and why the next foreign policy crisis for the world's number one power might well involve the world's number two power. but first here's my take. now that president obama has won re-election, the debate in washington has shifted from whether we should raise taxes to how and by how much. this makes sense. with a deficit over a trillion dollars, we will need a combination of increased tax revenues and spending cuts. the president and his allies including robert rubin have made the case that eliminating deductions simply will not get you enough money. you will actually have to raise tax rates. that's probably true as well. but let's not give up entirely on the issue of deductions and all those other hidden subsidies that the simpson-bowles report accurately called backdoo
perspective. we've assembled experts from europe, middle east, and asia to tell us how the rest of the world sees this election. then i have a panel of distinguished historians, walter isa isaacson, sean wilentz and edmund morris to look at an eye to the past. what do past campaigns and past presidents tell us about this nail-biter? also americans might be anxious to learn tuesday's results of the chinese are even more anxious, perhaps, to learn who their new leaders will be, why they might have more at stake than we do. but first here's my take. whoever wins the election on tuesday, on wednesday either barack obama or mitt romney will have to start worrying about the same urgent challenge, how to stop the united states from falling over the fiscal cliff. this is, of course, the second cliff hanger that the united states has faced in two years, the first being the debt ceiling debacle. how did the world's greatest democracy start functioning so badly? maybe the next president can try to fix this broader problem. but first the fiscal cliff. unless congress act, the spending cuts and tack incr
voted to legalize recreational use of marijuana, which will mark the beginning of the end of the war on drugs. this may be the most costly, distorting and futile war the united states has ever waged. over the past four decades we have spent $1 trillion to fight this war, without reducing the availability of drugs in cities, while also destroying our penal system. the u.s. has more than three times as many prisoners per capita as we had in 1980 and about ten times as many prisoners per capita as other rich countries, according to data from the oecd. about 1.6 million americans were arrested in 2010 on drug charges, most for using marijuana. this week's votes indicate that americans have begun rethinking these policies, perhaps moving towards ones that would deprive drug cartels of their huge profits and allow our police to focus on serious crime. perhaps the most stunning shift this week came not in the passage of a ballot measure or law but an exit poll finding, one that might move us toward major legislation. when asked what should be done with the almost 12 million illegal immigran
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)